Princeton Study Observes Group Consciousness Has Physical Effects On World During Large-Scale Events – The Global Elite

For the first time in scientific history researchers have discovered that group consciousness (i.e. collective consciousness) elicits physical changes in the physical world around us. Researchers made the discovery in a groundbreaking study from Princeton University’s PEAR Laboratory (Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research). “The power of thought is not just ideological. It manifests physically. Cohesion between individuals ramps up this power,” write the study’s authors. The research was spearheaded by Roger Nelson, who coordinated research at PEAR for two decades, and who is now the director of the Global Consciousness Project (GCP), a collaboration between researchers world-wide to test the power of human consciousness.

GCP writes: “In field applications, the research shows that in situations which produce a coherent group consciousness the data may depart from expectation even without specific intentions. The GCP/EGG project’s measures are a direct extension of the laboratory and field applications of the REG technology. In field studies with REGs we have found consistent deviations from expected randomicity in data taken in situations where groups become integrated or unified by something of common interest. During deeply engaging meetings, concerts, rituals, etc., the data tend to exhibit slightly greater order than random data should, and we are able to predict this deviation with small but significant success.”

“The best way to describe the anomalous effects we see in the data is as a correlation that comes to exist between the devices spread around the world — just during major events, defined in terms of the widespread attention and emotion the produce,” adds GCP “That is, there are departures from expectation when human consciousness is powerfully engaged. The devices are designed to be independent, and they are separated by hundreds or thousands of kilometers, and yet we see the correlations — that is anomalous, and it is linked with consciousness. The implication is that we are not isolated from each other as seems to be the case, but linked in a subtle, unconscious and inaccessible way. Learning more about that, and tapping into the potential of our interconnection is the next phase of human development. We are at the beginning, and ready to move forward.”

The discovery provides major proof to the existence of the Unified Field (also known as Uniform Field Theory), a theory of quantum physics. Dr. John Hagelin is Professor of Physics and Director of the Doctoral Program in Physics at Maharishi International University in Iowa, and in one of his published papers he examines the connection between group consciousness and the Unified Field: “Following a general introduction to Unified Quantum Field theories, we consider [the proposal that] the Unified Field of modern theoretical physics and the field of ‘pure consciousness’ are identical. We show that the proposed identity between consciousness and the unified field is consistent with all known physical principles, but requires an expanded physical framework for the understanding of consciousness. Such a framework may indeed be required to account for experimentally observed field effects of consciousness and phenomenological aspects of higher states of consciousness.”

To learn more about Princeton’s PEAR Lab research you can watch the video below. David Lynch also describes the Unified Field theory beautifully in a terrific Q&A which you can watch below. And Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor also touches on the very same subject in perhaps the most profound TED Talk of all, entitled “Stroke Of Insight,” her personal account of her brush with the Unified Field when the left hemisphere of her brain shut down. You can also watch Dr. John Hagelin in his own words as he summarizes years of scientific research bridging consciousness and the Unified Field in the lecture below.

Psyleron – Princeton Mind-Matter Interaction Research

Jill Bolte Taylor’s stroke of insight

The Charlie Rose Brain Series 2: Consciousness

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The Universe in You: A Higher Consciousness – The Conscious Continuum

One of the most profound experiences in life that one can have is to fully realize the infinite interconnectedness of everything ~

This experience goes much deeper than the words on this page. As a synthesis of the left and the right brain, the mind, body, spirit, and heart, come together effortlessly for the benefit of all of life. To experience the wholeness of existence through mind and spirit is to see the world as a single gigantic organism with its own collective mind. Everything connects to everything else, boundaries break down, and many ecological alignments become perceivable. From here, the universe is not a merely a collection of inanimate parts but rather, is alive, intelligent, and a product of your own creation.

A higher consciousness is not to be judged as better than any other state of being, it simply is an operation of human awareness on a different wavelength. It is more closely aligned with love, peace, joy, and gratitude, and can see a bigger picture.

While effortlessly flowing with nature in grace and simplicity, a higher consciousness values spiritual purification, awakening, transcendence, liberation, unconditional love, compassion for all, emotional mastery, presence, mindfulness, gratitude, unity, deeper and deeper levels on interconnectedness, selfless living, and humility.

When awakening to a higher state of awareness, the metaphysical background of reality that lies beyond the mind, begins to shine. One begins to fully recognize “Maya” or the illusion that has been painted onto our reality. From here, one can see past the illusion and is able to transcend all concepts, philosophies, biases or beliefs. Embodying this truth results in a radiance of love, and a manifestation of the self for the benefit of existential reality, life, and the entire planet.

One also begins to clearly see that all of what mankind is really searching for is a higher consciousness. At the core of our being, we are all searching for love, which is achieved unconditionally with a progressive evolution of our awareness. As a result of this understanding, one becomes interested in cooperative action for elevating the consciousness of mankind while helping to awaken humanity and assist in remembering the magnificence of our existence. This is a process of integration that leads to wholeness and synthesis that lies beyond analysis, and gives rise to an importance of being, as opposed to knowing, doing and having.

We may then come to realize, in truth, that we are not just a coincidental being that happened to appear billions of years after the big bang. But we are in fact, the heart of it all.

Concepts in this article were interpreted from my personal research on Spiral Dynamics. Credit to: Clara Graves, Don Beck, Christopher Cowan for this amazing work.

Involution’s Essence. The Uneaten Core. (Only Consciousness) – INVOLUTION: Science and God: Reality Redefined

What is the book about? (A Vision to Challenge Darwinian Randomness and Competition) Memory Creating and Integrating towards Unification.

This epic charts the history of scientific thought to offer a complementary and challenging vision of evolution. Involution— the in’forming’ by memory of the structure of matter— and by co-creating the material forms, integrating a ‘unified intelligence’, akin to a bio-computer pervading throughout. Diversity (and convergence) were consensual, not merely or even dominantly competitive. This book proposes that the history of scientific thought was the incremental recovery of memory (through the inspirations of genius) and uses the evidence of science’s chronology itself to tilt at the insufficiency of the scientific viewpoint.

How is the tale told? ( An Odyssey through Individuals- called Genius.)

By retaking the story of human understanding, from the unified theories of pre-Socratic Greece, through the Dark Ages, the Renaissance and Enlightenment to Modernism it tracks the continuous thread of what science has ignored, its own inspired and maverick origins. It moves from the unified field origins of the universe through the divergence of forms, to the single Man, who re-spirals and retraces this journey in reverse. The early fields of pre-Socratic integrated understanding (Parmenides, Empedocles, Pythagoras Heraclitus) splits after Plato and Aristotle and then diverges through the scientific disciplines until, from Einstein, Schrodinger and now Laszlo, Man returns to the unified field theories of QM and relativity, the last remaining division.

That division is the product of the process of science, to divorce its intellect from the unified bio-computer (consciousness) in which intellect is, in fact, embedded: and to which it is occasionally susceptible. Poets mystics (and genius) have provided ample evidence.

The reliance on inspiration, subjective, single, unrepeatable, and individual defies everything science claims to be about. Yet it drew its sustenance and direction from such moments and such individuals. This is a book about unique contemplative people, not just an idea.

It weaves its spiral like a single DNA molecule through memory, the record of evolving consciousness. The two companions who narrate and argue are Reason (who holds up the catalogue of scientists and their ideas, left brain and uni-directional ) and  Soul (who signals the multi-dimensional inspirations of art and music). Together they trace the episodes of genius and embrace in those moments when memory informed the journey of memory’s recovery.The Odyssey of Mankind is back towards Eden- holistic spirituality.

Why is it important to read it? (Why science is on the cusp of change)

It is, the book maintains, the recovery of memory that has inspired the model science has built of evolution, the collective intellect or what Teilhard de Chardin called the Noosphere.  In the process, science has ignored the severing of man’s mind, epitomized by the two hemispheres of his brain and permitted the dominance of the left, when it was the right that truly guided it. Mind and matter are perceived as distinct through this artificial separation of intellect from consciousness. All is consciousness, the field where DNA shapes and is shaped by electromagnetism in its varying forms, and the deeper Akashic Field, the ‘ether’ record of space-time, in which nothing is lost.

Science still perceives that field as external and searches for deficient matter, and the origins of consciousness; proposing un-testable string theories, antimatter and anti-gravity, when the deficiencies themselves are possibly created by science’s collective blindness. Creation’s reality is consensual, and the error ( and limitations) lie in consensual perception. The world we have, we have created ( subject to laws and the consent of the whole). Having exhausted the external materialism of intellect where the cupboard is now almost bare, science stands on the cusp of change, and must dive into consciousness that connects. Involution explains how this occurred and why all will now change. Consciousness is all there is: to some it appears solid, to others illusory and to some non existent. Relativity extends throughout perception: degrees of spiritual perception. The mirror reflects back what looks into it.

This is a bold ( many would say foolhardy) hypothesis but only because new to science, the perennial philosophy is the oldest story of all. Man’s return to Eden through the Exile caused by knowledge was always foretold. Rather than the ‘dictator’ of evolutionary change by error and slow increments, DNA is the resonant collaborator conserving it all yet changing constantly, communicating incessantly. Brain is not the emitter, but the receiver of this field of information. Sometimes.

Why Symphonic Prose? ( A musical language for a harmonious truth.)

Perhaps the use of ancient rhythmical language is itself an indication that recovery has reached its origins and may now be the language an integrated vision requires. Science has involuted back to metaphysics, consciousness to poetry. If we look at evolution through the lens of science and the logic of prose, encumbered by necessary facts, we are limited to only the external half that intellect permits. Science is the spectrum of understanding chosen because it is well known and provides a sturdy ladder, but only to afford a greater height  for the vision of a science behind science (The Cathedral behind the Scaffolding). By looking at memory through the multi-layered evocation of symphonic prose we find, as readers, what we already know. It is gratifying to keep company with poets and find the familiar.  This odyssey is to the depth of ourselves.

The Author might show you the scars

New Study Links Human Consciousness to a Law That Governs the Universe

 

Human Entropy

Our species has long agonized over the concept of human consciousness. What exactly causes it, and why did we evolve to experience consciousness? Now, a new study has uncovered a clue in the hunt for answers, and it reveals that the human brain might have more in common with the universe than we could have imagined.

According to a team of researchers from France and Canada, our brains might produce consciousness as something of a side effect of increasing entropy, a process that has been taking place throughout the universe since the Big Bang.

Their study has been accepted for publication in the journal Physical Review E.

The concept of entropy is famously confusing, and the definition has evolved over time. Essentially, entropy is a thermodynamic property that refers to the degree of disorder or randomness in a system. It can be summed up as the description of a system’s progression from order to disorder.

 

The second law of thermodynamics states that entropy can only remain constant or increase within a closed system — a system cannot move from high entropy to low entropy without outside interference. A common example that demonstrates entropy is an ice cube melting — the cube is in a state of low entropy, but as it melts and disorder grows, entropy increases.

Many physicists think that the universe itself is in a constant state of increasing entropy. When the Big Bang occurred, the universe was in a state of low entropy, and as it continues to gradually spread out, it is growing into a higher entropy system. Based on this new study, our brain may be undergoing something similar, and consciousness happens to be a side effect of the process.

The Brain and Disorder

To see how the concept of entropy could be applied to the human brain, the researchers analyzed the amount of order in our brains while we’re conscious compared to when we’re not. They did this by modeling the networks of neurons in the brains of nine participants, seven of whom had epilepsy.

They looked at whether or not neurons were oscillating in phase with one another as this could tell them if the brain cells were linked. They compared observations from when patients were awake, when they were asleep, and when patients with epilepsy were having seizures.

The researchers found that the participants’ brains displayed higher entropy when fully conscious. “We find a surprisingly simple result: normal wakeful states are characterized by the greatest number of possible configurations of interactions between brain networks, representing highest entropy values,” the team wrote in the study.

This finding prompted the researchers to suggest that consciousness might be a side effect of a system working to maximize information exchange. In other words, human consciousness emerges due to increasing entropy.

While the team’s theory is exciting and will likely lead to further research exploring a potential link between human consciousness and entropy, it is far from conclusive. The study’s sample size was exceptionally small, so they’ll need to replicate their results on larger groups and different types of brain states. Still, it provides a fascinating explanation for human consciousness and may be the clue that eventually helps us fully understand the strange phenomenon.

Neuroscientists Say They’ve Identified The Unique Brain Patterns of Consciousness

Humans have learned to travel through space, eradicate diseases and understand nature at the breathtakingly tiny level of fundamental particles.

Yet we have no idea how consciousness – our ability to experience and learn about the world in this way and report it to others – arises in the brain.

In fact, while scientists have been preoccupied with understanding consciousness for centuries, it remains one of the most important unanswered questions of modern neuroscience.

Now our new study, published in Science Advances, sheds light on the mystery by uncovering networks in the brain that are at work when we are conscious.

It’s not just a philosophical question. Determining whether a patient is “aware” after suffering a severe brain injury is a huge challenge both for doctors and families who need to make decisions about care.

Modern brain imaging techniques are starting to lift this uncertainty, giving us unprecedented insights into human consciousness.

For example, we know that complex brain areas including the prefrontal cortex or the precuneus, which are responsible for a range of higher cognitive functions, are typically involved in conscious thought.

However, large brain areas do many things. We therefore wanted to find out how consciousness is represented in the brain on the level of specific networks.

The reason it is so difficult to study conscious experiences is that they are entirely internal and cannot be accessed by others.

For example, we can both be looking at the same picture on our screens, but I have no way to tell whether my experience of seeing that picture is similar to yours, unless you tell me about it.

Only conscious individuals can have subjective experiences and, therefore, the most direct way to assess whether somebody is conscious is to ask them to tell us about them.

But what would happen if you lose your ability to speak? In that case, I could still ask you some questions and you could perhaps sign your responses, for example by nodding your head or moving your hand.

Of course, the information I would obtain this way would not be as rich, but it would still be enough for me to know that you do indeed have experiences.

If you were not able to produce any responses though, I would not have a way to tell whether you’re conscious and would probably assume you’re not.

Scanning for networks

Our new study, the product of a collaboration across seven countries, has identified brain signatures that can indicate consciousness without relying on self-report or the need to ask patients to engage in a particular task, and can differentiate between conscious and unconscious patients after brain injury.

When the brain gets severely damaged, for example in a serious traffic accident, people can end up in a coma. This is a state in which you lose your ability to be awake and aware of your surrounding and need mechanical support to breathe.

It typically doesn’t last more than a few days. After that, patients sometimes wake up but don’t show any evidence of having any awareness of themselves or the world around them – this is known as a “vegetative state”.

Another possibility is that they show evidence only of a very minimal awareness – referred to as a minimally conscious state. For most patients, this means that their brain still perceives things but they don’t experience them.

However, a small percentage of these patients are indeed conscious but simply unable to produce any behavioural responses.

fMRI scanner (Semiconscious/Wikipedia/Public Domain)fMRI scanner (Semiconscious/Wikipedia/Public Domain)

We used a technique known as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which allows us to measure the activity of the brain and the way some regions “communicate” with others.

Specifically, when a brain region is more active, it consumes more oxygen and needs higher blood supply to meet its demands.

We can detect these changes even when the participants are at rest and measure how it varies across regions to create patterns of connectivity across the brain.

We used the method on 53 patients in a vegetative state, 59 people in a minimally conscious state and 47 healthy participants. They came from hospitals in Paris, Liège, New York, London, and Ontario.

Patients from Paris, Liège, and New York were diagnosed through standardised behavioural assessments, such as being asked to move a hand or blink an eye.

In contrast, patients from London were assessed with other advanced brain imaging techniques that required the patient to modulate their brain to produce neural responses instead of external physical ones – such as imagining moving one’s hand instead of actually moving it.

(Tagliazucchi et al. 2019)(Tagliazucchi et al. 2019)

We found two main patterns of communication across regions. One simply reflected physical connections of the brain, such as communication only between pairs of regions that have a direct physical link between them.

This was seen in patients with virtually no conscious experience.

One represented very complex brain-wide dynamic interactions across a set of 42 brain regions that belong to six brain networks with important roles in cognition (see image above). This complex pattern was almost only present in people with some level of consciousness.

Importantly, this complex pattern disappeared when patients were under deep anaesthesia, confirming that our methods were indeed sensitive to the patients’ level of consciousness and not their general brain damage or external responsiveness.

Research like this has the potential to lead to an understanding of how objective biomarkers can play a crucial role in medical decision making.

In the future it might be possible to develop ways to externally modulate these conscious signatures and restore some degree of awareness or responsiveness in patients who have lost them, for example by using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques such as transcranial electrical stimulation.

Indeed, in my research group at the University of Birmingham, we are starting to explore this avenue.

Excitingly the research also takes us as step closer to understanding how consciousness arises in the brain.

With more data on the neural signatures of consciousness in people experiencing various altered states of consciousness – ranging from taking psychedelics to experiencing lucid dreams – we may one day crack the puzzle.The Conversation

Davinia Fernández-Espejo, Senior Lecturer, School of Psychology and Centre for Human Brain Health, University of Birmingham.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Carl Sagan’s Profound Essay On Why Cannabis Consciousness is Desperately Needed in This Mad and Dangerous World | High Existence

“Cannabis brings us an awareness that we spend a lifetime being trained to overlook and forget and put out of our minds.”

— Carl Sagan

Most of us remember Carl Sagan as a brilliant scientist, a popularizer of both the methods and progress of human knowledge. Some know him as an advocate of space exploration and peace on earth. Some will even recognize his brilliant work in the science fiction community, as a writer himself, and as a commentator on sci-fi authors such as Arthur C. Clarke.

Carl Sagan, 1994. Photo Credit: Johann Heupel (Flickr Commons

Few, however, know that he wrote an absolutely thrilling and insightful essay on the merits of the psychoactive properties of the cannabis plant.

Writing under the pseudonym ‘Mr. X’ (due to the political sensitivity of coming out as a smoker), Carl starts out by going into the well-known sensory enhancements bestowed by cannabis, most notably those which occur during sex, while listening to music, and while savoring art.

While these qualities are important and valuable in themselves, the true magic of an altered state of consciousness lies in its paradigm-shifting potential, as Sagan eloquently explains

After reading this essay, you might agree with us that Carl’s famous saying, “The cosmos is within us. We are starstuff. We are a way for the universe to know itself.” was first thought of when he was rather high.

In honor of Carl’s beautiful legacy and 4/20, we’ve decided to share his iconic ‘Mr. X’ essay in full below. Savor this magnificent explanation of the cannabis experience from one of the greatest minds of the 20th century.

[Pro-Tip: Have a toke before reading, and we promise you can read the whole essay in Sagan’s voice.]

Dr. Sagan’s Profound ‘Mr. X’ Essay

It all began about ten years ago. I had reached a considerably more relaxed period in my life – a time when I had come to feel that there was more to living than science, a time of awakening of my social consciousness and amiability, a time when I was open to new experiences. I had become friendly with a group of people who occasionally smoked cannabis, irregularly, but with evident pleasure. Initially I was unwilling to partake, but the apparent euphoria that cannabis produced and the fact that there was no physiological addiction to the plant eventually persuaded me to try. My initial experiences were entirely disappointing; there was no effect at all, and I began to entertain a variety of hypotheses about cannabis being a placebo which worked by expectation and hyperventilation rather than by chemistry. After about five or six unsuccessful attempts, however, it happened.

I was lying on my back in a friend’s living room idly examining the pattern of shadows on the ceiling cast by a potted plant (not cannabis!). I suddenly realized that I was examining an intricately detailed miniature Volkswagen, distinctly outlined by the shadows. I was very skeptical at this perception, and tried to find inconsistencies between Volkswagens and what I viewed on the ceiling. But it was all there, down to hubcaps, license plate, chrome, and even the small handle used for opening the trunk. When I closed my eyes, I was stunned to find that there was a movie going on the inside of my eyelids. Flash . . . a simple country scene with red farmhouse, a blue sky, white clouds, yellow path meandering over green hills to the horizon. . . Flash . . . same scene, orange house, brown sky, red clouds, yellow path, violet fields . . . Flash . . . Flash . . . Flash. The flashes came about once a heartbeat. Each flash brought the same simple scene into view, but each time with a different set of colors . . . exquisitely deep hues, and astonishingly harmonious in their juxtaposition. Since then I have smoked occasionally and enjoyed it thoroughly. It amplifies torpid sensibilities and produces what to me are even more interesting effects, as I will explain shortly.

I can remember another early visual experience with cannabis, in which I viewed a candle flame and discovered in the heart of the flame, standing with magnificent indifference, the black-hatted and -cloaked Spanish gentleman who appears on the label of the Sandeman sherry bottle. Looking at fires when high, by the way, especially through one of those prism kaleidoscopes which image their surroundings, is an extraordinarily moving and beautiful experience.

I want to explain that at no time did I think these things ‘really’ were out there. I knew there was no Volkswagen on the ceiling and there was no Sandeman salamander man in the flame. I don’t feel any contradiction in these experiences. There’s a part of me making, creating the perceptions which in everyday life would be bizarre; there’s another part of me which is a kind of observer. About half of the pleasure comes from the observer-part appreciating the work of the creator-part. I smile, or sometimes even laugh out loud at the pictures on the insides of my eyelids. In this sense, I suppose cannabis is psychotomimetic, but I find none of the panic or terror that accompanies some psychoses. Possibly this is because I know it’s my own trip, and that I can come down rapidly any time I want to.

While my early perceptions were all visual, and curiously lacking in images of human beings, both of these items have changed over the intervening years. I find that today a single joint is enough to get me high. I test whether I’m high by closing my eyes and looking for the flashes. They come long before there are any alterations in my visual or other perceptions. I would guess this is a signal-to-noise problem, the visual noise level being very low with my eyes closed. Another interesting information-theoretical aspects is the prevalence – at least in my flashed images – of cartoons: just the outlines of figures, caricatures, not photographs. I think this is simply a matter of information compression; it would be impossible to grasp the total content of an image with the information content of an ordinary photograph, say 108 bits, in the fraction of a second which a flash occupies. And the flash experience is designed, if I may use that word, for instant appreciation. The artist and viewer are one. This is not to say that the images are not marvelously detailed and complex. I recently had an image in which two people were talking, and the words they were saying would form and disappear in yellow above their heads, at about a sentence per heartbeat. In this way it was possible to follow the conversation. At the same time an occasional word would appear in red letters among the yellows above their heads, perfectly in context with the conversation; but if one remembered these red words, they would enunciate a quite different set of statements, penetratingly critical of the conversation. The entire image set which I’ve outlined here, with I would say at least 100 yellow words and something like 10 red words, occurred in something under a minute.

The cannabis experience has greatly improved my appreciation for art, a subject which I had never much appreciated before. The understanding of the intent of the artist which I can achieve when high sometimes carries over to when I’m down. This is one of many human frontiers which cannabis has helped me traverse. There also have been some art-related insights – I don’t know whether they are true or false, but they were fun to formulate. For example, I have spent some time high looking at the work of the Belgian surrealist Yves Tanguey. Some years later, I emerged from a long swim in the Caribbean and sank exhausted onto a beach formed from the erosion of a nearby coral reef. In idly examining the arcuate pastel-colored coral fragments which made up the beach, I saw before me a vast Tanguey painting. Perhaps Tanguey visited such a beach in his childhood.

A very similar improvement in my appreciation of music has occurred with cannabis. For the first time I have been able to hear the separate parts of a three-part harmony and the richness of the counterpoint. I have since discovered that professional musicians can quite easily keep many separate parts going simultaneously in their heads, but this was the first time for me. Again, the learning experience when high has at least to some extent carried over when I’m down. The enjoyment of food is amplified; tastes and aromas emerge that for some reason we ordinarily seem to be too busy to notice. I am able to give my full attention to the sensation. A potato will have a texture, a body, and taste like that of other potatoes, but much more so. Cannabis also enhances the enjoyment of sex – on the one hand it gives an exquisite sensitivity, but on the other hand it postpones orgasm: in part by distracting me with the profusion of image passing before my eyes. The actual duration of orgasm seems to lengthen greatly, but this may be the usual experience of time expansion which comes with cannabis smoking.

I do not consider myself a religious person in the usual sense, but there is a religious aspect to some highs. The heightened sensitivity in all areas gives me a feeling of communion with my surroundings, both animate and inanimate. Sometimes a kind of existential perception of the absurd comes over me and I see with awful certainty the hypocrisies and posturing of myself and my fellow men. And at other times, there is a different sense of the absurd, a playful and whimsical awareness. Both of these senses of the absurd can be communicated, and some of the most rewarding highs I’ve had have been in sharing talk and perceptions and humor. Cannabis brings us an awareness that we spend a lifetime being trained to overlook and forget and put out of our minds. A sense of what the world is really like can be maddening; cannabis has brought me some feelings for what it is like to be crazy, and how we use that word ‘crazy’ to avoid thinking about things that are too painful for us. In the Soviet Union political dissidents are routinely placed in insane asylums. The same kind of thing, a little more subtle perhaps, occurs here: ‘did you hear what Lenny Bruce said yesterday? He must be crazy.’ When high on cannabis I discovered that there’s somebody inside in those people we call mad.

When I’m high I can penetrate into the past, recall childhood memories, friends, relatives, playthings, streets, smells, sounds, and tastes from a vanished era. I can reconstruct the actual occurrences in childhood events only half understood at the time. Many but not all my cannabis trips have somewhere in them a symbolism significant to me which I won’t attempt to describe here, a kind of mandala embossed on the high. Free-associating to this mandala, both visually and as plays on words, has produced a very rich array of insights.

There is a myth about such highs: the user has an illusion of great insight, but it does not survive scrutiny in the morning. I am convinced that this is an error, and that the devastating insights achieved when high are real insights; the main problem is putting these insights in a form acceptable to the quite different self that we are when we’re down the next day. Some of the hardest work I’ve ever done has been to put such insights down on tape or in writing. The problem is that ten even more interesting ideas or images have to be lost in the effort of recording one. It is easy to understand why someone might think it’s a waste of effort going to all that trouble to set the thought down, a kind of intrusion of the Protestant Ethic. But since I live almost all my life down I’ve made the effort – successfully, I think. Incidentally, I find that reasonably good insights can be remembered the next day, but only if some effort has been made to set them down another way. If I write the insight down or tell it to someone, then I can remember it with no assistance the following morning; but if I merely say to myself that I must make an effort to remember, I never do.

I find that most of the insights I achieve when high are into social issues, an area of creative scholarship very different from the one I am generally known for. I can remember one occasion, taking a shower with my wife while high, in which I had an idea on the origins and invalidities of racism in terms of gaussian distribution curves. It was a point obvious in a way, but rarely talked about. I drew the curves in soap on the shower wall, and went to write the idea down. One idea led to another, and at the end of about an hour of extremely hard work I found I had written eleven short essays on a wide range of social, political, philosophical, and human biological topics. Because of problems of space, I can’t go into the details of these essays, but from all external signs, such as public reactions and expert commentary, they seem to contain valid insights. I have used them in university commencement addresses, public lectures, and in my books.

But let me try to at least give the flavor of such an insight and its accompaniments. One night, high on cannabis, I was delving into my childhood, a little self-analysis, and making what seemed to me to be very good progress. I then paused and thought how extraordinary it was that Sigmund Freud, with no assistance from drugs, had been able to achieve his own remarkable self-analysis. But then it hit me like a thunderclap that this was wrong, that Freud had spent the decade before his self-analysis as an experimenter with and a proselytizer for cocaine; and it seemed to me very apparent that the genuine psychological insights that Freud brought to the world were at least in part derived from his drug experience. I have no idea whether this is in fact true, or whether the historians of Freud would agree with this interpretation, or even if such an idea has been published in the past, but it is an interesting hypothesis and one which passes first scrutiny in the world of the downs.

I can remember the night that I suddenly realized what it was like to be crazy, or nights when my feelings and perceptions were of a religious nature. I had a very accurate sense that these feelings and perceptions, written down casually, would not stand the usual critical scrutiny that is my stock in trade as a scientist. If I find in the morning a message from myself the night before informing me that there is a world around us which we barely sense, or that we can become one with the universe, or even that certain politicians are desperately frightened men, I may tend to disbelieve; but when I’m high I know about this disbelief. And so I have a tape in which I exhort myself to take such remarks seriously. I say ‘Listen closely, you sonofabitch of the morning! This stuff is real!’ I try to show that my mind is working clearly; I recall the name of a high school acquaintance I have not thought of in thirty years; I describe the color, typography, and format of a book in another room and these memories do pass critical scrutiny in the morning. I am convinced that there are genuine and valid levels of perception available with cannabis (and probably with other drugs) which are, through the defects of our society and our educational system, unavailable to us without such drugs. Such a remark applies not only to self-awareness and to intellectual pursuits, but also to perceptions of real people, a vastly enhanced sensitivity to facial expression, intonations, and choice of words which sometimes yields a rapport so close it’s as if two people are reading each other’s minds.

Cannabis enables nonmusicians to know a little about what it is like to be a musician, and nonartists to grasp the joys of art. But I am neither an artist nor a musician. What about my own scientific work? While I find a curious disinclination to think of my professional concerns when high – the attractive intellectual adventures always seem to be in every other area – I have made a conscious effort to think of a few particularly difficult current problems in my field when high. It works, at least to a degree. I find I can bring to bear, for example, a range of relevant experimental facts which appear to be mutually inconsistent. So far, so good. At least the recall works. Then in trying to conceive of a way of reconciling the disparate facts, I was able to come up with a very bizarre possibility, one that I’m sure I would never have thought of down. I’ve written a paper which mentions this idea in passing. I think it’s very unlikely to be true, but it has consequences which are experimentally testable, which is the hallmark of an acceptable theory.

I have mentioned that in the cannabis experience there is a part of your mind that remains a dispassionate observer, who is able to take you down in a hurry if need be. I have on a few occasions been forced to drive in heavy traffic when high. I’ve negotiated it with no difficult at all, though I did have some thoughts about the marvelous cherry-red color of traffic lights. I find that after the drive I’m not high at all. There are no flashes on the insides of my eyelids. If you’re high and your child is calling, you can respond about as capably as you usually do. I don’t advocate driving when high on cannabis, but I can tell you from personal experience that it certainly can be done. My high is always reflective, peaceable, intellectually exciting, and sociable, unlike most alcohol highs, and there is never a hangover. Through the years I find that slightly smaller amounts of cannabis suffice to produce the same degree of high, and in one movie theater recently I found I could get high just by inhaling the cannabis smoke which permeated the theater.

There is a very nice self-titering aspect to cannabis. Each puff is a very small dose; the time lag between inhaling a puff and sensing its effect is small; and there is no desire for more after the high is there. I think the ratio, R, of the time to sense the dose taken to the time required to take an excessive dose is an important quantity. R is very large for LSD (which I’ve never taken) and reasonably short for cannabis. Small values of R should be one measure of the safety of psychedelic drugs. When cannabis is legalized, I hope to see this ratio as one of he parameters printed on the pack. I hope that time isn’t too distant; the illegality of cannabis is outrageous, an impediment to full utilization of a drug which helps produce the serenity and insight, sensitivity and fellowship so desperately needed in this increasingly mad and dangerous world.

This account was written in 1969 for publication in Marijuana Reconsidered (1971). Sagan was in his mid-thirties at that time. He continued to use cannabis for the rest of his life.

12 Most Common Signs Your Consciousness Is Raising To Higher Vibrational Levels

The spiritual awakening of each person is a unique journey, a path that each one of us needs to walk on alone and win all the struggles to self-acknowledgement and spiritual enlightenment. The spirits, energies and consciousness level are different for each person. That means that the spiritual awakening or just raised consciousness manifest differently to different people.

There are 12 basic and most common signs that indicate your level of consciousness and vibration are raising. Check out if you are going through this specific process:

1. You are more in control of your emotions

You start to see your emotional side with different eyes. You learn that you are able to control your emotions better than ever before and you learn that each outburst of emotion takes big responsibility.

2. You become open-minded and adopt a better perspective of living your life

You start to truly value open-mindedness and being free. You respect the fine things in life and you search for a true purpose of living, something above the trivial monotony of the everyday life.

3. You are more grateful for everything that you have in life whatever they may be

You start to respect and value everything around you, including nature, God and yourself. You set your priorities straight and you are happy with what you have at the moment.

4. You have increased empathic skills and are able to put yourself in the shoes of others

You become more compassionate than ever before and you feel that your empathic skills are increased.

5. You become highly creative and want to approach things in a new and better way

Your open-mindedness and the new concepts of living you want to implement give you the inspiration and the initiative to be creative and produce new intellectual and material properties.

6. You have an increased self-awareness

You become more focused on your position in the social circles and how you relate to other people. You care more about your own actions and the consequences.

7. You have become difficult to manipulate and no longer follow the rule of others

You do your own thing regardless of what others think of it.

8. You easily forgive others. You have come to distinguish between the sin from the sinner

Your energy becomes softer and lighter. You are less aggressive and dualistic.

9. You are more kind to others, even to animals and plants

Most especially, you are more kind to yourself. You understand that all life is sacred.

10. You are able to give without expecting something in return

It’s because you adhere to the workings of positive karma.

11. You meditate every day to connect with your Higher Self.

Meditating and being spiritually active is one of the crucial steps to seeking spiritual enlightenment. If you don’t meditate or execute any form of spiritual practice, you should begin immediately. If not else, you will feel both physically and mentally better.

12. You shut yourself from people, situations or places that can give you a negative vibration

You recognize and acknowledge the power of energy and the vibrations of people’s aura. You won’t risk being surrounded by people full of negativity and plagued by negative karma.

Source: Lifecoachcode

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Conquering kids’ self-consciousness

Self-consciousness can be awful. It’s the feeling you get that everyone is looking at you. It makes kids feel anxious about going into new situations, and impacts negatively on their quality of life.

Self-consciousness tends to come and go over the years.

Often eldest boys extremely shy and self-conscious as early as pre-school. It can make them do silly things. The trait may fade for a while then revisit in early adolescence.

Early teen girls often suffer from self-consciousness too, particularly if they are early or late maturers.

Some kids just hate to do anything in public for fear of being noticed…….or laughed at. They think that everyone is looking at them. In a school concert, for example, most parents have eyes only for their own children. They won’t really take too much notice of any other children, unless of course, they fluff their lines or muck-up big time..

However, no matter how logical you are in your coaching, self-consciousness can still hold many kids back. Here are four ideas to help your child conquer self-consciousness:

1.Help them prepare for public performances: They can practise a talk, or even rehearse an opening line, to help them break the ice in social situations. Practice leads to competence, which often alleviates self-consciousness.

2.Use baby steps in social situations: If they feel uncomfortable meeting a whole bunch of new people, then perhaps they can meet just one new friend at a party. That can make it easier than trying to meet too many people at once, which can be overwhelming.

3.Practise strong self-talk: Self-conscious kids often have atrocious self-talk. They say everyone is watching them enter a room, when the reality if quite different. Help them develop some realistic and more assertive messages they can say to themselves.

4. Catch kids being brave: What you focus on expands ,so make sure you highlight instances of kids being brave and overcoming possibly embarrassing situations. Also let them know that even though they may have stumbled, or fluffed a line or two, the room didn’t cave in. It wasn’t so bad.

Kids often grow out of their self-consciousness as they gain the confidence that comes from spreading their wings and enjoying new experiences. In the meantime, encourage them to try new experiences; coach them for social success and give them the tools to manage their anxiousness, which can be debilitating for many.

The post Conquering kids’ self-consciousness appeared first on Parenting Ideas.

“While stroking an octopus, it is easy to fall into reverie… an uplink to universal consciousness.”

“Despite centuries of investigation by everyone from natural historians, psychologists, and psychiatrists, to ethicists, neuroscientists, and philosophers, there is still no universal definition of emotion or consciousness,” Laurel Braitman wrote in her terrific exploration of the mental lives of animals. Virginia Woolf defined consciousness as “a wave in the mind,” but even if we’re able to ride the wave, we hardly know the ocean out of which it arises.

During my annual visit to NPR’s Science Friday to discuss my choices for the year’s best science books, my co-guest — science writer extraordinaire Deborah Blum — mentioned a fascinating book that had slipped my readerly tentacles, one that addresses this abiding question of consciousness with unparalleled rigor and grace: The Soul of an Octopus: A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder of Consciousness (public library) by naturalist, writer, and documentary filmmaker Sy Montgomery.

Montgomery begins with a seemingly simple premise. The octopus is a creature magnificently dissimilar to us — it can change shape and color, tastes with its skin, has its mouth in its armpit, and is capable of squeezing its entire body through a hole the size of an apple. And since we humans experience reality in profoundly different ways from one another, based on our individual consciousnesses, then the octopus must be inhabiting an altogether different version of what we call reality.

The constellation of complexities comprising this difference, Montgomery reveals over the course of this miraculously insightful and enchanting book, expands our understanding of consciousness and sheds light on the very notion of what we call a “soul.”

North Pacific Giant Octopus by photographer Mark Laita from his project Sea

She writes:

More than half a billion years ago, the lineage that would lead to octopuses and the one leading to humans separated. Was it possible, I wondered, to reach another mind on the other side of that divide? Octopuses represent the great mystery of the Other.

Among the pitfalls of the human condition is our tendency to see otherness as a source of dread rather than an invitation to friendly curiosity. The octopus, as the ultimate Other, has a long history of epitomizing this inclination and sparking our primal fear of the unknown. Montgomery cites one particularly emblematic depiction from Victor Hugo’s novel Toilers of the Sea:

The spectre lies upon you; the tiger can only devour you; the devil-fish, horrible, sucks your life-blood away… The muscles swell, the fibres of the body are contorted, the skin cracks under the loathsome oppression, the blood spurts out and mingles horribly with the lymph of the monster, which clings to the victim with innumerable hideous mouths…

Setting out to “defend the octopus against centuries of character assassination,” Montgomery notes that octopuses have highly individual personalities and can exhibit marked curiosity — faculties we tend to think of as singularly human. Even their motives for friendliness and unfriendliness, far from the baseless brutality of depictions like Hugo’s, parallel our own:

In one study, Seattle Aquarium biologist Roland Anderson exposed eight giant Pacific octopuses to two unfamiliar humans, dressed identically in blue aquarium uniforms. One person consistently fed a particular octopus, and another always touched it with a bristly stick. Within a week, at first sight of the people — looking up at them through the water, without even touching or tasting them — most of the octopuses moved toward the feeder and away from the irritator. Sometimes the octopus would aim its water-shooting funnel, the siphon near the side of the head with which an octopus jets through the sea, at the person who had touched it with the bristly stick.

Surely, a skeptic might argue that this is more instinct than “consciousness.” But Montgomery goes on to outline a number of strikingly specific and context-considered behaviors indicating that octopuses are animated by complex conscious experiences — things we tend to term “thoughts” and “feelings” in the human realm — that upend our delusions of exceptionalism. Lest we forget, we have a long history of bolstering those delusions by putting other species down, much like petty egotists try to make themselves feel big by making other people feel small — even Jane Goodall contended with dismissal and ridicule when she first suggested that chimpanzees have consciousness.

Pacific giant octopus by photographer Susan Middleton from her project Spineless

But beyond intellectual considerations of this weird and wonderful creature’s inner life, Montgomery points to the physical, bodily presence with an octopus as a transcendent experience in its own right — one that pulls into question our most basic assumptions about consciousness:

While stroking an octopus, it is easy to fall into reverie. To share such a moment of deep tranquility with another being, especially one as different from us as the octopus, is a humbling privilege. It’s a shared sweetness, a gentle miracle, an uplink to universal consciousness.

Indeed, the book’s greatest reward isn’t the fascinating science — although that is riveting and ablaze with rigor — but Montgomery’s bewitching prose, pouring from the soul of a literary naturalist who paints the marvels of the ocean’s depths like Thoreau did the marvels of the New England woods. Finding herself “drunk with strange splendors” as she beholds the marine world’s “parade of wonders,” Montgomery writes:

A splendid toadfish hides beneath a rock. Once thought to live only in Cozumel, it’s pancake flat, with thin, wavy, horizontal blue and white stripes, Day-Glo yellow fins, and whiskery barbels. A four-foot nurse shark sleeps beneath a coral shelf, peaceful as a prayer. A trumpet fish, yellow with dark stripes, floats with its long, tubular snout down, trying to blend in with some branching coral… A school of iridescent pink and yellow fish slide by inches from our masks, then wheel in unison like birds in the sky.

I have known no natural state more like a dream than this. I feel elation cresting into ecstasy and experience bizarre sensations: my own breath resonates in my skull, faraway sounds thump in my chest, objects appear closer and larger than they really are. Like in a dream, the impossible unfolds before me, and yet I accept it unquestioningly. Beneath the water, I find myself in an altered state of consciousness, where the focus, range, and clarity of perception are dramatically changed.

Suddenly acutely aware that the octopuses she has met and come to love on her expeditions experience this dizzying otherworldliness as their basic backdrop of existence, she considers the limited array of sensations and perceptions that we’ve come to accept as the whole or reality:

The ocean, for me, is what LSD was to Timothy Leary. He claimed the hallucinogen is to reality what a microscope is to biology, affording a perception of reality that was not before accessible. Shamans and seekers eat mushrooms, drink potions, lick toads, inhale smoke, and snort snuff to transport their minds to realms they cannot normally experience.

[…]

In my scuba-induced altered state, I’m not in the grip of a drug: I am lucid in my immersion, voluntarily becoming part of what feels like the ocean’s own dream.

Out of this perspective-shifting consideration arises Montgomery’s most profound inquiry. Sitting in a Tahitian temple dedicated to the spirit of the octopus, where one of her expeditions has taken her, she wonders:

What is the soul? Some say it is the self, the “I” that inhabits the body; without the soul, the body is like a lightbulb with no electricity. But it is more than the engine of life, say others; it is what gives life meaning and purpose. Soul is the fingerprint of God.

Others say that soul is our innermost being, the thing that gives us our senses, our intelligence, our emotions, our desires, our will, our personality, and identity. One calls soul “the indwelling consciousness that watches the mind come and go, that watches the world pass.” Perhaps none of these definitions is true. Perhaps all of them are. But I am certain of one thing as I sit in my pew: If I have a soul — and I think I do — an octopus has a soul, too.

This, no doubt, is what Alan Watts meant when he asserted that “Life and Reality are not things you can have for yourself unless you accord them to all others.”

The Soul of an Octopus is an astoundingly beautiful read in its entirety, at once scientifically illuminating and deeply poetic, and is indeed a worthy addition to the best science books of the year.

You can listen to the complete Science Friday segment below: